My Dell Dimension 4600, a really good, stable and fast computer that I got for an incredible price! Before I go on with my story, I want to list its original specs.

  • Intel Pentium 4 processor – 2.66 GHz, 533 FSB, 512 KB cache
  • PC3200 memory – 256 MB total (2 sticks of 128 MB)
  • IDE hard drive – 40 GB, 5400 RPM
  • CD drives – 1 DVD/CD reader, 1 CD-RW
  • Power supply – 250 watts
  • 3 PCI slots
  • 1 AGP 8x
  • 56k modem
  • Integrated peripherals – PS/2 mouse and keyboard ports, printer port, serial port, video port, 5.1 sound card, network interface, and 8 USB 2.0’s (2 in front, 6 in back)

Back around March of 2008, I found the used Dell Dimension at my local Goodwill store. The price… $3.00! Don’t get too excited, a lot of parts were removed from the system. Main parts that were still included with the system were:

  • The two original optical drives
  • The CPU (surprisingly was there, but not in the socket)
  • The motherboard (plastic bracket that held the heat sink on the processor was broken)
  • 56k Modem

The computer was well worth $3 dollars for the two CD drives, assuming that they worked. If the motherboard didn’t work, then I would just throw the whole machine out. So I went ahead and bought the computer.

Back at home, I removed the CD drives from the computer and hooked them up to my IDE-to-USB adapter. Both CD drives worked perfectly without any problems. After I was done with the CD drives, I wanted to see if I could get the entire computer working. If I could, it would be a nice replacement for my aging and not-so-upgradable Dell Optiplex GX100. I didn’t have the available parts that were compatible with the motherboard, but I was able to barrow some parts from school (college).

After getting permission, I was able to barrow some memory, a heat sink, and a power supply. I was also able to keep a heat sink bracket (to replace the broken one) and a Dell-style fan. During installation, I noticed the CPU had a few bent pins, possibly from laying in the case. Carefully, I was able to bend the pins back into place. I removed the old heat sink bracket and installed the new one before installing the heat sink. After making all the connections and installments, I was able to boot the computer to the BIOS. I installed an old hard drive and attempted to install Windows XP on it. After installing Windows and the drivers, the computer seemed to work fine with no problems.

After running the computer for several days, I decided that the motherboard was in good shape. I returned the parts that I barrowed and spent about $50 on memory, a power supply, and a copper heat sink. Since I didn’t get the fan assembly with the shroud, and the motherboard had only one fan connector, I had to buy a fan adapter that tapped into the power supply. I was able to request the recovery CD’s from Dell so that I had a licensed copy of Windows XP on the computer. I was also able to find a spare hard drive that I had lying around.

Success! All that hard work and I got a decent computer working again! All for under $60! For over 3 years, it has been running perfectly. Very fast and powerful. After being used as a secondary computer, I decided to replace my main desktop with the Dimension to help stay up-to-date with newer software. I also decided to upgrade its components…

Current Specs (As of June 2013)

  • Intel Pentium 4 processor with Hyper threading – 3.00 GHz, 800 MHz FSB, 1 MB cache
  • 2 GB of memory – PC3200 400 MHz
  • 160 GB, 7200 RPM, 8 MB cache hard drive – Serial ATA (1.5 GB/s)
  • Both optical drives write to DVD double layer discs, one has Lightscribe
  • NVIDIA GeForce 6200 AGP video card with 256 MB of memory, VGA and DVI out
  • Internal floppy disk drive
  • Creative Sound Blaster Live! 5.1 Value (CT4780) Dell OEM

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